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20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the egyptian pound. the u.s. secretary of state, hillary clinton, is being treated for a blood clot in a vain between her brain and skull. doctors caring for say she should make a full recovery. earlier this month, the veteran politician suffered a concussion after fainting and falling down. >> hillary clinton in belfast earlier this month, the end of a typically frenetic a foreign trip, for countries in five days. is thought to contracted a stomach virus. at home, she fell and suffered a concussion. she's now being treated at this new york hospital and has been told to avoid this sort of punishing travelled has taken her to more foreign capitals than any of her predecessors. 112 on countries and more than a million miles. hillary clinton is popular home. she's one of the most trusted members of president obama's cabinet. she missed at least one important domestic in nature and since falling ill -- a congressional hearing to answer questions about the attacked in an gussie. -- attack in benghazi. it is not clear whether she has plans to return next month. it's hardly the conclusion -- this hi
something things i hadn't seen before. first paul tsongas started talking about gay issues then bill clinton appeared at the palace theater in may of '92 before a gay audience, before television cameras and national political reporters and made some very concrete promises to the gay crowd he was the presumive nominee then and somebody whose position hadn't done that before and it seemed to me looking at that and looking at the attitude of the republicans what were hammering on gay and lesbian voters and with pat robertson and pat buchanan from the pulpit of the republican national convention, between those two attitudes, those polarizing rejection and acceptance, a national gay block vote formed for the first time and that affected the election in a decisive way. >> rose: what did you do? >> i wrote an op-ed piece for the "new york times" saying it had a huge psychological effect and might affect the election and i wrote it and thinking about it the week after i wrote if this is going to happen, why isn't this a book? and if it's a book why shouldn't i try to do it? >> i remember a friend of
of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: next, secretary of state hillary clinton was hospitalized yesterday after doctors discovered she had a blood clot. few details of her condition were initially released, but late today her doctors said the clot was located in a vein between her skull and brain. they stressed she did not suffer a stroke and is making excellent progress. dr. gholam motamedi, a neurologist at medstar georgetown university hospital, is here to walk us through the known risks and treatments for blood clots. i guess, doctor to start at the very beginning, what is a blood clot. >> blood normally has a tendency to coagulate or clot. if you take the blood out of the system, out of the circulatory system t will clot. if you are, let's say, laying down in a hospital, typically in a hospitalization, without movement, blood has a tendency to form clots. and sometimes under abnormallal circumstances. there are medical conditions that make you more susceptible to have your blood clot. and from cancers to chemotherapy agents to infections and so forth. but m
tax provisions, the bill also reinstates clinton-era limits on exemptions and deductions for higher-income americans. and tax rates will rise from 35% to 40% for estates worth $5 million or more. congress also agreed to extend unemployment insurance for the long-term jobless, for another year. most democrats had wanted more, but nearly all voted for the bill. >> this legislation breaks the iron barrier that for far too long has prevented additional tax revenues from the very wealthiest. >> woodruff: in the senate, the bill had sailed to overwhelming, bipartisan approval, early on new year's morning. today, majority leader harry reid summed up. >> it was a piece of legislation that we weren't all elated about, but it moved the ball forward. we have so many more hard decisions to make in the year >> this is not the way to run the senate! >> reporter: but republican jeff sessions of alabama warned that congress can't go on transacting its business this way. >> we are really too often using midnight hour votes on the eve of a crisis to ram through big historic legislation that has >> wo
of the prejudice by being visible about it. helping to block. the conviction of bill clinton of impeachment. i've done a lot of work for affordable housing, rental housing. i understand the rap on me and other liberals is we push poor people into homeownership. and it's exactly the opposite of the case. we were trying to prevent those kinds of bad loans. and i'm beginning to see a substantial reduction in america's military budget and doing away with the notion that 65 years after world war ii we continue to have to protect the whole world. >> reporter: no concern that dodd-frank on the one hand, goes too far, as some people say, and on the other hand, as others say, doesn't go far enough? >> no, i don't think in any area it goes too far. as to the regulators, i would have been worried if mitt romney had been elected because he would have appointed non- regulators. but i think the people in place under president obama who helped write the law believe in it. the common theme in the bill, as i saw it, was to say to a great extent, people who make decisions that are risky, which should be done in
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)